Vancomycin intermediately resistant Staphylococcus aureus



Vancomycin intermediately resistant Staphylococcus aureus





Vancomycin intermediately resistant Staphylococcus aureus (VISA) is a mutation of a bacterium that’s spread easily by direct person-to-person contact. It was first discovered in mid-1996 when clinicians found the microbe in a Japanese infant’s surgical wound. Similar isolates were reported in Michigan and New Jersey. Both patients had received multiple courses of vancomycin for methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) infections.

Another mutation, vancomycin-resistant S. aureus (VRSA) is fully resistant to vancomycin. Patients most at risk for resistant organisms include:



  • patients with a history of taking vancomycin, third-generation cephalo-sporins, or antibiotics targeted at anaerobic bacteria (such as Clostridium difficile)


  • patients with indwelling urinary or central venous catheters


  • elderly patients, especially those with prolonged or repeated hospital admissions


  • patients with cancer or chronic renal failure


  • patients undergoing cardiothoracic or intra-abdominal surgery or organ transplants


  • patients with wounds with an opening to the pelvic or intra-abdominal area, including surgical wounds, burns, and pressure ulcers


  • patients with enterococcal bacteremia, often associated with endocarditis


  • patients exposed to contaminated equipment or to a patient with the infecting microbe.

Jun 16, 2016 | Posted by in GENERAL & FAMILY MEDICINE | Comments Off on Vancomycin intermediately resistant Staphylococcus aureus
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